Visual observations of La Soufriere Volcano on Sunday were limited due to low cloud cover and frequent periods of rain throughout the day

Visual observations of La Soufriere Volcano on Sunday were limited due to low cloud cover and frequent periods of rain throughout the day. This also did not allow for the completion of the monitoring station on the upper flank of the volcano.

According to the latest bulletin from NEMO, visual observations of the dome late in the afternoon allowed for clear views into the crater. 

The dome continues to increase in height, to spread laterally and to emit volcanic gases.  The areas of most active gas emission were noted to be the contact areas between the pre-existing 1979 dome and the 2020 dome, as well as the top of this new dome.

An extensive area of burnt vegetation was observed in the western section of the crater floor, extending outwards from the dome.

Analysis of the data from the aerial survey of the dome and from measurement of volcanic gases that were undertaken on Saturday 16th January 2021 was carried out on Sunday by Drs Stinton and Christopher for most of the day.

The electronics team led by Instrumentation Engineer, Lloyd Lynch completed the necessary network connections on Sunday to enable the Owia Seismic Station to be brought online. 

The data is now being transmitted to monitoring scientists. This now brings the total number of seismic stations being used to monitor the volcano to five.

 

 

 



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